Kins. 21. INFJ.

"Out of the thousands who are known, or who want to be known, as poets, maybe one or two are genuine and the rest are fakes, hanging around the sacred precincts, trying to look like the real thing. Needless to say, I am one of the fakes and this is my story."

Amateur poet, writer and RPer from the North of England.

Tracking: #akinsman

say something

Oscar Pistorious gets five years? (At least two of which he probably won’t serve?)

Because of his actions a woman is DEAD. Their are longer sentences for burglary and fraud and drugs. Even if he didn’t intend to kill his girlfriend, he certainly DID intend to kill a burglar when he FIRED HIS GUN REPEATEDLY THROUGH A CLOSED DOOR.

What the fuck kind of world are we living in?

why the fuck is itunes red???

Viola Davis is a freaking tour de force. As she slowly peels back her wig, her eyelashes and wipes away her makeup, you can just see Annalise come undone. She doesn’t say a word, but you can feel the pain radiating off her. It gave me the chills. (x)

Olivia, my eldest daughter, caught measles when she was seven years old. As the illness took its usual course I can remember reading to her often in bed and not feeling particularly alarmed about it. Then one morning, when she was well on the road to recovery, I was sitting on her bed showing her how to fashion little animals out of coloured pipe-cleaners, and when it came to her turn to make one herself, I noticed that her fingers and her mind were not working together and she couldn’t do anything.

“Are you feeling all right?” I asked her.

“I feel all sleepy, ” she said.

In an hour, she was unconscious. In twelve hours she was dead.

The measles had turned into a terrible thing called measles encephalitis and there was nothing the doctors could do to save her.

That was twenty-four years ago in 1962, but even now, if a child with measles happens to develop the same deadly reaction from measles as Olivia did, there would still be nothing the doctors could do to help her.

On the other hand, there is today something that parents can do to make sure that this sort of tragedy does not happen to a child of theirs. They can insist that their child is immunised against measles. I was unable to do that for Olivia in 1962 because in those dayssc a reliable measles vaccine had not been discovered. Today a good and safe vaccine is available to every family and all you have to do is to ask your doctor to administer it.

It is not yet generally accepted that measles can be a dangerous illness.

Believe me, it is. In my opinion parents who now refuse to have their children immunised are putting the lives of those children at risk.

In America, where measles immunisation is compulsory, measles like smallpox, has been virtually wiped out.

Here in Britain, because so many parents refuse, either out of obstinacy or ignorance or fear, to allow their children to be immunised, we still have a hundred thousand cases of measles every year.

Out of those, more than 10,000 will suffer side effects of one kind or another.

At least 10,000 will develop ear or chest infections.

About 20 will die.

LET THAT SINK IN.

Every year around 20 children will die in Britain from measles.

So what about the risks that your children will run from being immunised?

They are almost non-existent. Listen to this. In a district of around 300,000 people, there will be only one child every 250 years who will develop serious side effects from measles immunisation! That is about a million to one chance. I should think there would be more chance of your child choking to death on a chocolate bar than of becoming seriously ill from a measles immunisation.

So what on earth are you worrying about?

It really is almost a crime to allow your child to go unimmunised.

Roald Dahl, 1986

(via brain-confetti)

TEAM VACCINE

(via watchoutfordinosaurs)

NINETEEN EIGHTY SIX.

roald dahl was calling out the anti-vaccination movement as self indulgent bullshit //thirty god damn years ago//.

(via ultralaser)

Over 1,000 preventable deaths and 128,000 preventable illnesses since 2007 and counting

And this is only in recent history. I can’t imagine the numbers if we had data all the way back to 1986.

(via autistiel)

And thanks to anti-vaxxers, measles is back in the United States.

(via thebicker)

There were lies you were told about WWII, Hitler being evil wasn’t one of them

theroguefeminist:

I remember a while back there was this immensely popular post with a gif of Hitler flattering his wife, that had tons and tons of notes from all these people gushing about how they had no idea Hitler was human too. When I criticized it, this older blogger claimed all these tumblr teens were taught in school to “dehumanize” Hitler, and now they were learning more than the simplistic narrative they were taught in school. It was, according to them, mind-broadening and important. The dehumanization of Hitler they claimed is a huge problem, and a bigger problem was young people thinking too simplistically about this complex person.

But this is the thing:

It’s true you are taught a simplistic and misleading narrative about World War II and the Nazis in school. But the problem isn’t that you’re taught to think badly of Hitler and Nazis, who committed mass murder, torture, enslavement, and other human rights abuses. The problem is you are taught that the US was the good guy and the Nazis were the antithesis to everything the US represented and now represents. You’re taught that the US came in and saved everyone in the name of freedom and democracy and crushed those Nazi fascists! And everyone lived happily ever after.

When in reality, the US invented eugenics which inspired the Nazis’ Aryan racial ideals in the first place. The Nazis modeled their treatment of Jews, Romani and other minorities after how the US treated Black people. Not only that, but the US refused the entry of many European Jews fleeing the Holocaust into this country. The US refused to help the Jews and other minorities targeted by Nazis. The US ignored please begging them to destroy gas chambers when they were so close within striking distance in Europe that they hit one accidentally.

What happened was after Pearl Harbor put the US at risk, they got involved and then they made up a story about why they were the good guys and why the Germans were the bad guys, about how they were now all about saving the world and the poor Jews. And the truth about antisemitism in the US (there were literal signs saying NO JEWS and shit, which you never learn about in school), about eugenics in the US, about the US’s deadly passivity for much of WWII, is actively erased, glossed over or explained away. And meanwhile, irony of ironies, the US sent thousands of Japanese Americans to internment camps—which of course were not the same as Nazi Germany’s extermination and concentration camps, but weren’t exactly the kind of thing someone who was ideologically opposed to Nazis would do. (You’re taught about the internment of Japanese Americans in school, but you aren’t encouraged to think about it as compromising the US’s alleged position as ideologically opposing Nazi Germany).

The US has used WWII to its advantage to create a particular narrative. It’s arguably a big reason antisemitism in the US changed and Jews started to achieve much greater access to whiteness. Associating Jews with whiteness dissociates Nazis from American racism and eugenics, despite how much mental gymnastics you have to do to ignore the fact white supremacy was at the core of Nazi ideology (people continually allege Jews were white in Nazi Germany despite the fact Nazis killed them, literally, to purify the white race). It takes the conversation away from the end result of white supremacy: genocide and brutality. Think about how important that would have been in the 1930s and 40s when the US was even more overtly racist than it is now. How would the US look: a nation where PoC, and Black people especially, were constantly exposed to violence and oppression? When what allowed the concentration camps in Nazi Germany to exist was a change to their constitution that allowed the deprivation of human rights in particular spaces, and all Roosevelt had to do was write an executive order depriving Japanese Americans of rights just as easily. Criticisms of white supremacy and human rights violations in Nazi Germany open up the same criticisms toward the US. I’m not the first to have that idea. Harper Lee tackles it in To Kill a Mockingbird.

Tumblr SJ who complain the Holocaust gets “too much attention” compared to other social injustices also seem to miss this point—they suggest it’s ~Jewish privilege~ or white privilege that explains why everyone cares more about the Holocaust, ignoring the fact that the mainstream narrative in the US about the Holocaust and WWII also often erases the long history of antisemitism in Europe and the history of it in the US. The narrative suggests Nazis arbitrarily decided on Jews as a scapegoat and ignores the racialization of Jews in Europe. There’s also an implication that with the end of the Holocaust came the end of antisemitism. Many aspects of the mainstream narrative around the Holocaust is hurtful to Jews. Ignoring the role of white supremacy in the Holocaust does no marginalized people any favors: as well as making it too easy to let the US off the hook for creating eugenics in the first place, it also erases Romani, who were targeted in the genocide, and are still definitely not racialized as white to this day.

The US is a racist empire (and I say empire because we currently live on colonized land and also exert worldwide control) and while I don’t like comparing Nazi Germany to anything, we’re not the opposite of Nazi Germany by any means—we certainly were not in the 1940s when we fought them. I don’t think the US is the same or even similar to Nazi Germany (as I said, I don’t like making lazy comparisons like that), but I think both the US and Nazi Germany have two terrible things in common: white supremacy and a government that has the power to deprive citizens of their basic rights at a moment’s notice.

That’s the story you’re not taught in school. That’s the mind blowing epiphany that actually matters.

Hitler being human is a fact of course. But he was a horrible, horrible human being, probably one of the worst in history. And making excuses for him being primarily responsible for wiping out one third of population of a people (Jews; edit: see here), 90% of the population of another (Romani), as well as countless other atrocities doesn’t make you interesting, edgy or counter-culture. It makes you downright despicable.

Sadly, it seems tumblr’s teens find the idea of Hitler flirting with his wife more interesting and mind-blowing than the idea that everything they were taught about the US’s role in WWII is slanted to mislead them.

I left Doctor Who because I could not get along with the senior people. I left because of politics. I did not see eye-to-eye with them. I didn’t agree with the way things were being run. I didn’t like the culture that had grown up, around the series. So I left, I felt, over a principle.

I thought to remain, which would have made me a lot of money and given me huge visibility, the price I would have had to pay was to eat a lot of shit. I’m not being funny about that. I didn’t want to do that and it comes to the art of it, in a way. I feel that if you run your career and– we are vulnerable as actors and we are constantly humiliating ourselves auditioning. But if you allow that to go on, on a grand scale you will lose whatever it is about you and it will be present in your work.

If you allow your desire to be successful and visible and financially secure – if you allow that to make you throw shades on your parents, on your upbringing, then you’re knackered. You’ve got to keep something back, for yourself, because it’ll be present in your work. A purity or an idealism is essential or you’ll become– you’ve got to have standards, no matter how hard work that is. So it makes it a hard road, really.

You know, it’s easy to find a job when you’ve got no morals, you’ve got nothing to be compromised, you can go, ‘Yeah, yeah. That doesn’t matter. That director can bully that prop man and I won’t say anything about it’. But then when that director comes to you and says ‘I think you should play it like this’ you’ve surely got to go ‘How can I respect you, when you behave like that?’

So, that’s why I left. My face didn’t fit and I’m sure they were glad to see the back of me. The important thing is that I succeeded. It was a great part. I loved playing him. I loved connecting with that audience. Because I’ve always acted for adults and then suddenly you’re acting for children, who are far more tasteful; they will not be bullshitted. It’s either good, or it’s bad. They don’t schmooze at after-show parties, with cocktails.

Christopher Eccleston (via thehellofitall)

FOREVER REBLOG THIS CLASSY ASSHOLE

(via k3llyb3an)

jojomirabelle:

triple-fang:

Trans  Drag

Drag  Trans

This has been a PSA. Thank you. 

Literally everybody needs to understand this IMMEDIATELY

IF WE'RE TALKING ABOUT QUEER HEADCANONS THAT DO/DO NOT WORK how do u feel about trans man victor frankenstein (idk if im just projecting onto the text but i just FEEL LIKE there's SOMETHING GOING ON THERE idk)

cryingalonewithfrankenstein:

spookyscarymulder:

I feel like Jack cryingalonewithfrankenstein would especially have some awesome meta for this mostly because I feel like Jack has already done this, or I could be completely fabricating this memory.

THAT SAID, I love, love LOVE transman Victor because it’s SO WELL supported by his neurotic obsession with the patriarchal heritage of his surname and his obsession with masculine physicality and ugliness versus the beautiful and his idealization of Clerval. Victor’s desire to represent himself as first and foremost a Genevese, a Frankenstein and a descendent of masculine privilege and greatness is the fucking lynchpin for this and I love it.

I probably have, but I think you covered everything I’d want to say — oh, no, wait, my thoughts are all jumbled but pardon me:

Yes, absolutely. I think one aspect I’d point out in addition is that Victor has a really odd, twisted relationship with the entire idea of reproduction. It seems to both attract and repel him, and I think something about that stems from the way that women were often shoved into the box of “your duty as a person is to marry a nice man and have lots of children” — a Victor who had female socialization forced upon him at some point seems to jive with that. As if he’s still trying to cope with the role he was pressured to accept, trying to find a way he could make his family proud of him for continuing the Frankenstein name without having to play a female role that in no way fits him.

I dunno, I’m not terribly organized, but those are some of the thoughts I have. In short, yes, trans man Victor is my fave thing hi hello <3

Who am I to you? Anonymously leave a fruit or two in my inbox.

  1. Apple: I haven't really taken notice of you so far.
  2. Honeydew: You fascinate me.
  3. Banana: You annoy me.
  4. Mullberry: Mostly I tolerate you on my dash.
  5. Cherry: You make me uncomfortable.
  6. Orange: I love your blog, but I'm not very interested in you personally.
  7. Grapefruit: I don't care so much for your blog, but I'm rather interested in you as a person.
  8. Kiwi: Love your blog, equally interested in you as a person.
  9. Pineapple: I think about you even when I'm not on tumblr.
  10. Rasberry: I'm not even aware I'm re-blogging from you when I do.
  11. Strawberry: I wasn't even aware I was following you. How did that happen?
  12. Mango: I wouldn't mind talking to you if you ever messaged me, but it's not that big of a deal to me.
  13. Apple: I would really like to talk to you, but I never will initiate it.
  14. Guava: I have no interest in talking with you on here.
  15. Blueberry: Sometimes, I like and re-blog posts from you just to get your attention.
  16. Cantaloupe: I often avoid liking and re-blogging your post so I don't draw your attention.
  17. Watermelon: I'm not very interested in you or your blog, I'm just too lazy to unfollow you.
  18. Elderberry: I've anon-ed you something personal before.
  19. Pumpkin: I've anon-ed you a compliment before.
  20. Kumquat: I've anon-ed you hate before.
  21. Lemon: Never anon-ed you before, probably won't again.
  22. Lime: We've never talked and I prefer to keep it that way.
  23. Papaya: We used to talk but we don't anymore and that makes me sad.
  24. Rhubarb: We used to talk and we don't anymore and I prefer it that way.
  25. Tangerine: We talk on here sometimes and I want it to continue.
  26. Plum: Meh.
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